Maintenance

Maintanance

A photo taken in 1997 in the engine yard atĀ Chittorgarh in Rajasthan, India.

This loco was being prepared to work the service to Mhow in Madhya Pradesh. Steam services on the metre gauge did not have long to run and these engines disappeared soon after and were replaced by diesels.

I was made very welcome by the shed foreman who plied me with cups of water as I stood and completed a drawing of one of the engines.

 

 

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Steam in ’61

Steam in '61

This is a picture from my misspent youth and was taken at the wonderful Snow Hill station in Birmingham in 1961. The station had a splendid overall roof and was built as such by the GWR in 1912. Unfortunately it was closed in 1972 and then demolished along with much of inner Birmingham when the city was redeveloped. The current station on the site is more like a bus stop than the glorious edifice seen here.

Okay, I have to admit that I was a railway anorak and carried my duffle bag and notebook with pride. The scene has a strong period flavour with its smokey atmosphere and the line of train spotters with their notebooks at the ready to take down the numbers of the engines that passed through these hallowed grounds.

The loco is a Great Western Railway 5600 class 0-6-2T engine that was built in September 1925. Initially they worked mainly in South Wales but by this time quite a few were working in the Wolverhampton Division and this freight is almost certainly heading north to Wolverhampton in this view. Steam on the former Great Western ended early in 1966 before most other regions of British Rail but surprisingly more locos from the Great Western have survived into preservation than all the rest of the old companies.

In the left background is the Catholic St Chad’s Cathedral that was consecrated in 1841 and was designed in the Gothic style by the renowned Augustus Pugin.

I miss those times.

 

Embsay Station 1

Embsay Station 1

If you have visited here before you will know that I like steam trains and there are plenty to choose from in the UK. This one is in the Yorkshire Dales near Skipton.

Over the past few days I have been going through my old black and white negatives and scanning a few of the better ones and some of these are of puffing billies. They will appear in forthcoming posts. Sorry!

Can’t have too much of a good thing!

 

Pickering

Pickering

A slightly different view of the steam train standing at Pickering Station recently on the basis that you can’t have enough pictures of such subject matter particularly as it recreates one of the joys of my childhood, that of standing at the side of the track waiting with growing excitement as the sound of a steam engine grows into a thunderous roar as it hurtles past with an express……… yes!

 

Station Scene

Station Scene

The National Railway Museum at York is just fabulous though many of the displays are quite difficult to photograph. One of the exhibition buildings is laid out as a terminal station and in this picture I couldn’t resist the temptation to add a bit of atmosphere in the form of steam and smoke. It would be good if the museum could do this, as well as some sound effects of a station in the days of steam. Then it really would have that atmosphere that I remember so well!

 

Loco at Pickering

Loco at Pickering

A second view of the steam locomotive captured at Pickering Station last week.

These engines were known as Black Fives and were a highly successful mixed traffic engines built by the London Midland and Scottish Railway in the late 1930s

 

Steam at Pickering

Steam at Pickering

We had driven north from Sheffield in Yorkshire and stopped off in York to visit the National Railway Museum. (Some photos to come)

We were heading for Northallerton where the intention was to undertake some further family history research at the county archive. After leaving York we stopped briefly at Pickering where I was fortunate to capture this working steam locomotive on its arrival from Whitby via the North York Moors Railway line. The unexpected is almost always more exciting and although I had enjoyed the NRM, there’s nothing quite like seeing a steam engine actually alive, breathing smoke and leaking steam.